REVSYS: SYSTEMATICS OF THE
SCORPION FAMILY VAEJOVIDAE

 

 

 

 

 

HomeScorpionsVaejovidaeThe ProjectActivities/Products AcknowledgmentsLinks
 

Meetings

Museum Visits

Field Trip Log

2009:
Queretaro
Hidalgo
Sonora
Guerrero

2008:
New Mexico
Arizona
Michoacan, Guerrero
Texas, New Mexico
California
Arizona, New Mexico
Baja California peninsula/islands
Arizona California New Mexico
Mississippi Louisiana
Arizona Nevada
Guerrero
Colima

2007:
Arizona New Mexico
Arizona
Arizona California New Mexico
Nevada
New Mexico Texas
Jalisco
Arizona Utah
Arizona New Mexico Texas
Morelos Guanajuato
Oaxaca Guerrero
Guerrero
Utah
Michoacan

2006:
Chiapas
California Nevada
Nuevo Leon San Luis Potosi Tamaulipas
Coahuila
Chihuahua Sonora
Oaxaca
Arizona New Mexico
Pacific Coast of Mexico
Veracruz
San Luis Potosí, Hidalgo, Querétaro
Michoacan, Guanajuato

2005:
Oaxaca
Pueblo, Oaxaca
California, Nevada
Veracruz, Chiapas
Durango, Chihuahua
México, Nayarit, Jalisco, Colima
Michoacan, Aguascalientes, Zacatecas, Jalisco, Colima
Sonora,Baja California, Baja California Sur
Chiapas (II)
Chiapas (I)

2004:
Puebla, Oaxaca, Chiapas, Tabasco
Tamaulipas, San Luis Potosí, Veracruz, Puebla, Oaxaca
southern California
Baja California Sur
Arizona, New México, Baja California, Baja California Sur

2002:
Arizona, New México
D.F., Puebla, Veracruz, Oaxaca, Edo. México, San Luis Potosí, Tamaulipas, Hidalgo


Progress

Publications

Specimen Database

U.S.A. (Arizona) 2007

5–7 October, 2007: Funded by the REVSYS grant. Volunteer Zach Valois and Kelsey Neeley travelled ca. 1,200 miles through central and northern Arizona, sampling biotic communities from the lower Colorado plateau desert, upper and lower Sonoran, chaparral, and petran montane coniferous forest. More than fifty scorpion specimens, representing three genera and five species, were collected.

14 September, 2007: Funded by the REVSYS grant. Naturalists Jim Bockowski, Donna Zeidel and Bill Schol accompanied volunteer Manny Rubio (zoologist living in Tucson) to search for Serradigitus agilis at the type locality. The description of the type locality is ambiguous and indefinite so the day was spent looking for suitable habitat that would be hunted with black-lights after dark. Fourteen potential sites (rock-faced road cuts with numerous, small, vertical fissures) were selected. No sites with a northern exposure were identified along the selected four mile stretch of road. Black-lighting (19h40-21h30) yielded a dozen specimens from five sites. All S. agilis were located from one to four meters above the ground on open, vertical faces; none were observed in habitat under canopy. Their diminutive size and quickness to retreat into small cracks made capturing S. agilis problematic; some escaped and others were crushed. A few likely locations, devoid of S. agilis, were inhabited by Centruroides exilicauda. One Pseudouroctonus apacheanus was found and appears to be a western range extension. A single Diplocentrus spitzeri was located among scree at the base of a S. agilis site. Vaejovis spinigerus were abundant (more than 40 specimens) along the ground litter in open and canopied places at all the sites searched; several were collected.

 


The material included in this site is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0413453.  Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.
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